Winners of the BJP International Photography Awards 2016

Juno Calypso and Felicity Hammond have been named the winners of British Journal of Photography’s International Photography Awards 2016.

Juno Calypso won the Series Award for Joyce, a collection of performative self-portraits that reflect on “modern rituals of seduction and the laboured construction of femininity.”

Seaweed-Wrap,-from-the-series-Joyce-2015-c-Juno-Calypso
Seaweed Wrap, from the series Joyce 2015 © Juno Calypso

As a photography student, Calypso spent her loan to fly to “the middle of nowhere in Pennsylvania,” alone, to picture herself in the state’s honeymoon hotels.

“I began staging these photographs three years ago, using my grandma’s bedroom as the set, or a room found on Airbnb,” Juno tells BJP. “The idea always starts with the location – finding somewhere with a time-warp feel. This year I went to stay alone at a couple’s honeymoon resort in the US to continue the project. So it begins with an appreciation of 1960s pink decor, but also ends up as an awkward social encounter. I like to explore those feelings – seduction, solitude, desire, disappointment.”

“Juno’s photography has a very original identity; visually it is surreal and seductive,” Hannah Watson said of the winning series. “Although she only graduated recently, she already has a unique voice in photography. I can’t wait to see how she will exhibit this work in a gallery context.”

Massage-Mask,-from-the-series-Joyce-2015-c-Juno-Calypso
Massage Mask, from the series Joyce 2015 © Juno Calypso

Felicity Hammond was awarded the Single Image Award for Restore to Factory Settings, a large scale photographic collage printed as a cyanotype.

Hammond’s image explores economic and social evolutions in London; a cityscape once defined by factories and industrial structures, now given over to the incredible demand for residential and office spaces.

Restore-to-Factory-Settings-2014-c-Felicity-Hammond
Restore to Factory Settings 2014 © Felicity Hammond

 

Via British Journal of Photography


Adam Nathaniel Furman

Monaco: “A little bit of 1930s Rome (in drag) for your living-room” by Adam Nathaniel Furman

Architect Adam Nathaniel Furman undertook a residency at the British School in Rome in 2014-15, as he became familiar with the city he was struck by the coming together of Italian style and consumerism with the ancient and resonant architectural and religious traditions. “It’s all present in Rome, there is a duality that runs through the city, there is a seriousness and weightiness – they have a word for it ‘romanita’. It was very present in the fascist period. At the same time there is this totally self absorbed sense of play, pleasure and sensuousness.” When Adam was commissioned to design some furniture for a client in Monaco, he decided to explore this idea further.

Adam_Furman_Monaco_Its_Nice_That_4

Architect Adam Nathaniel Furman undertook a residency at the British School in Rome in 2014-15, as he became familiar with the city he was struck by the coming together of Italian style and consumerism with the ancient and resonant architectural and religious traditions. “It’s all present in Rome, there is a duality that runs through the city, there is a seriousness and weightiness – they have a word for it ‘romanita’. It was very present in the fascist period. At the same time there is this totally self absorbed sense of play, pleasure and sensuousness.” When Adam was commissioned to design some furniture for a client in Monaco, he decided to explore this idea further.

Adam_Furman_Monaco_Its_Nice_That_5